Former CIA Officer Jason Hanson Reveals...

Spy Secrets That Can

Save Your Life

Get Out Alive

Trevor Saved By His Flintlock Pistol

SHARE
, / 410 0

Trevor was in his early 20’s. He was attending a local community college and money was tight…

But he loved to spend time outdoors, and he frequented a fishing spot on the banks of the Mississippi River.

The particular area wasn’t great for hunting but was ideal for fishing.

Trevor grew up around guns and knew how to shoot.

But he didn’t own any modern firearms.

The only gun he had was a Model 1805 Harper’s Ferry flintlock pistol inherited from a family member.

He admitted that a flintlock pistol isn’t ideal for concealed carry.

And despite knowing the capabilities, or lack thereof, Trevor believed it was better than nothing.

He figured his skills would apply to any firearm – even if it was an antique.

One day around noon, Trevor set out for his favorite fishing spot. It was about a two-mile hike from the parking lot.

He carried enough gear to last him the day. He had a first-aid kit, knife, and basic supplies.

And around his waist he wore his flintlock pistol in an old custom-made holster.

With the gun on his hip and the fishing pole in his hand, he set out on his hike.

Trevor was in a remote area and didn’t expect to see anyone.

About a mile into his hike, he looked up and saw a man in his 30’s walking towards him on the same trail.

The man looked rough and carried a bag full of empty beer cans.

When the two men met on the trail Trevor said “hi,” and the stranger said “hello” back.

He asked Trevor if he was hiking alone.

Trevor told the man he was on his way to fish.

The stranger looked around for a moment. This is when Trevor realized something was off.

He didn’t like the angle the stranger took when they stopped to talk. The entire encounter seemed weird.

This is when the stranger showed his right hand. He was holding a big survival knife.

As Trevor noticed the man gripping the knife, he moved back pushing his fishing vest out of the way.

The stranger could see the butt of the flintlock pistol.

The next thing the stranger said was “take care” as he continued walking on the trail.

Perhaps, he was looking to rob him. Or worse, maybe he wanted to harm him.

Either way, any gun is better than no gun.

But, is there really any reason you would want to own a flintlock pistol?

In a survival situation, most folks are going to want a modern firearm. Yet that’s not to say a flintlock gun doesn’t have a purpose.

Flintlocks first appeared in the early 1600s. The way they work is a piece of flint strikes the hammer.

This creates a spark that ignites black powder and the subsequent explosion propels a projectile out of the muzzle.

Advantages of Flintlocks

Feds don’t care:

If you own a flintlock gun made before 1899 it’s considered an antique firearm under federal law.

Also, modern muzzleloader weapons are still considered antique firearms.

A flintlock is a muzzleloader therefore, they are considered antiques.

This means these guns can be purchased outside of a licensed firearms dealer.

But, don’t forget to check your local laws.

Even if they are antique under federal law, state laws could be more restrictive.

Make your ammo:

These days guns and ammo are hard to come by.

If you have the proper equipment and ammo components you can make your ammo.

Depending on how long our ammo shortage lasts this could come in handy.

Extended hunting:

In many states, there are different hunting times and regulations for muzzleloaders.

My point is, with a flintlock you will have more opportunities for hunting compared to modern rifles.

If you need a deer tag to feed your family you might have a better chance using a muzzleloader.

Disadvantages to Flintlocks

One-shot:

The biggest drawback to any flintlock is that you have one shot at the ready, and reloading is time-consuming.

You would never want to use a flintlock in a self-defense situation unless it was the only weapon you had.

Wet and Dirty:

Flintlocks don’t do well with moisture. Once water is introduced it can make the weapon unreliable.

You wouldn’t want to shoot them in the rain or snow.

Also, plan to get dirty if you own a flintlock. Black powder produces a lot of filth.

Even the reloading process will get your hands covered in grime.

Kaboom:

Flintlock weapons often use black powder because it is easy to ignite.

But, this means it can be hard to find because it is explosive and availability can be limited.

Plus, the black powder can lead to rust on the rifle.

That’s because the powder absorbs moisture. So, if you leave any behind it will rust quickly.

All in all, flintlock guns can serve a purpose.

They have a few advantages that make them worthwhile.

Yet, I would never want to depend on one in a self-defense situation.

Flintlocks might be fun for plinking at the range or for a certain hunting experience.

But, other than that I would save your money and buy a more modern firearm.

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.

*